About Alcohol Awareness Week

Alcohol Awareness Week (11-17 November 2019) is a chance for the UK to get thinking about drinking - this year, the theme is Alcohol and me. It’s a week of awareness-raising, campaigning for change, and more.

When?

11-17 November 2019.

What?

Alcohol Awareness Week is a chance for the UK to get thinking about drinking. It’s a week of awareness-raising, campaigning for change, and more. The theme for Alcohol Awareness Week 2019 is ‘Alcohol and me’.

Who?

Alcohol Awareness Week is coordinated by us, Alcohol Change UK. Over 1,700 public health teams, workplaces, GP surgeries, pharmacies, hospitals, charities and other community groups across the country took part in and organised events for Alcohol Awareness Week 2018. It's easy to get involved - just follow the sign up link below!

Get involved in Alcohol Awareness Week. We provide free digital resources to help you run Alcohol Awareness Week in your community, including posters, social media images and factsheets.

Sign up now

Alcohol and me

The evidence that drinking too much isn’t good for us is strong. But how much is too much and what are the health risks associated with drinking?

During this year’s Alcohol Awareness Week we will be encouraging people to test their knowledge around the drinking guidelines and health impacts associated with drinking. We will be launching a quiz and an interactive body map to improve understanding and to motivate us all to think about the ways in which we drink, and to consider if it’s time to make a change. We’ll be encouraging people to get talking about alcohol, to start breaking down the shame and stigma that surrounds alcohol problems.

Alcohol and our families, communities and society

Alcohol doesn’t only impact on individuals who drink. During Alcohol Awareness Week we will get people thinking about how drinking affects our family and friends, our working lives, those living within our communities, and our society more generally.

Time for change

Finally, we’ll be calling for change. Alcohol harm can affect any one of us, from any walk of life. But with improved understanding, forward-thinking policy and better support and treatment we can change and save lives.